7    VisuAlgo.net / /matching Login (Unweighted Bipartite) Graph Matching (Unweighted General) Graph Matching
Modo de Exploração ▿

>

>
lento
rápido
go to beginning previous frame pause play next frame go to end

A Matching in a graph G = (V, E) is a subset M of E edges in G such that no two of which meet at a common vertex.


Maximum Cardinality Matching (MCM) problem is a Graph Matching problem where we seek a matching M that contains the largest possible number of edges. A possible variant is Perfect Matching where all V vertices are matched, i.e. the cardinality of M is V/2.


A Bipartite Graph is a graph whose vertices can be partitioned into two disjoint sets X and Y such that every edge can only connect a vertex in X to a vertex in Y.


Maximum Cardinality Bipartite Matching (MCBM) problem is the MCM problem in a Bipartite Graph, which is a lot easier than MCM problem in a General Graph.


Remarks: By default, we show e-Lecture Mode for first time (or non logged-in) visitor.
Please login if you are a repeated visitor or register for an (optional) free account first.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Próx. PgDn

This visualization is currently limited to unweighted graphs only. Thus, we currently do not support Graph Matching problem variants involving weighted graphs...


Pro-tip: Since you are not logged-in, you may be a first time visitor who are not aware of the following keyboard shortcuts to navigate this e-Lecture mode: [PageDown] to advance to the next slide, [PageUp] to go back to the previous slide, [Esc] to toggle between this e-Lecture mode and exploration mode.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

To switch between the unweighted MCBM (default, as it is much more popular) and unweighted MCM mode, click the respective header.


Here is an example of MCM mode. In MCM mode, one can draw a General, not necessarily Bipartite graphs. However, the graphs are unweighted (all edges have uniform weight 1).


The available algorithms are different in the two modes.


Another pro-tip: We designed this visualization and this e-Lecture mode to look good on 1366x768 resolution or larger (typical modern laptop resolution in 2017). We recommend using Google Chrome to access VisuAlgo. Go to full screen mode (F11) to enjoy this setup. However, you can use zoom-in (Ctrl +) or zoom-out (Ctrl -) to calibrate this.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

You can view the visualisation here!


For Bipartite Graph visualization, we will re-layout the vertices of the graph so that the two disjoint sets are clearly visible as Left and Right sets. For General Graph, we do not relayout the vertices.


Initially, edges have grey color. Matched edges will have black color. Free/Matched edges along an augmenting path will have Orange/Light Blue colors, respectively.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

There are three different sources for specifying an input graph:

  1. Draw Graph: You can draw any undirected unweighted graph as the input graph (note that in MCBM mode, the drawn input graph will be relayout into a nice Bipartite graph layout during algorithm animation),
  2. Modeling: A lot of graph problems can be reduced into an MCBM problem. In this visualization, we have the modeling examples for the famous Rook Attack problem (currently disabled) and standard MCBM problem (also valid in MCM mode).
  3. Examples: You can select from the list of our example graphs to get you started. The list of examples are slightly different in the two MCBM vs MCM modes.
Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

There are several Max Cardinality Bipartite Matching (MCBM) algorithms in this visualization, plus one more in Max Flow visualization:

  1. O(VE) Augmenting Path Algorithm (without greedy pre-processing),
  2. O(√(V)E) Dinic's Max Flow Algorithm, see Max Flow visualization, select Modeling → Bipartite Matching → All 1, then use Dinic's algorithm.
  3. O(√(V)E) Hopcroft Karp's Algorithm,
  4. O(kE) Augmenting Path Algorithm++ (with randomized greedy pre-processing),

PS: Although possible, we will likely not use O(V3) Edmonds's Matching Algorithm if the input is guaranteed to be a Bipartite Graph.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

Augmenting Path is a path that starts from a free (unmatched) vertex u in graph G, alternates through unmatched, match, ..., unmatched edges in G, until it ends at another free vertex v. If we flip the edge status along that augmenting path, we will increase the number of edges in the matching set M by 1 and eliminates this augmenting path.


In 1957, Claude Berge proposes the following lemma: A matching M in graph G is maximum iff there is no more augmenting path in G.


The Augmenting Path Algorithm is a simple O(V*(V+E)) = O(V2 + VE) = O(VE) implementation of that lemma (on Bipartite Graph): Find and then eliminate augmenting paths in Bipartite Graph G. Click Augmenting Path Algorithm Demo to visualize this algorithm on the currently displayed random Bipartite Graph.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn
vi match, vis; // global variables

int Aug(int L) { // return 1 if ∃ an augmenting path from L
if (vis[L]) return 0; // return 0 otherwise
vis[L] = 1;
for (auto &v : AL[L]) {
int R = v.first;
if (match[R] == -1 || Aug(match[R])) {
match[R] = L;
return 1; // found 1 matching
} }
return 0; // no matching
}
Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn
// in int main(), build the bipartite graph
// use directed edges from left set (of size VLeft) to right set
int MCBM = 0;
match.assign(V, -1);
for (int L = 0; L < VLeft; L++) {
vis.assign(VLeft, 0);
MCBM += Aug(L); // find augmenting path starting from L
}
printf("Found %d matchings\n", MCBM);

You can also download ch4_09_mcbm.cpp/java from Competitive Programming 3 companion website.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

If we are given a Complete Bipartite Graph KN/2,N/2, i.e.
V = N/2+N/2 = N and E = N/2×N/2 = N2/4 ≈ N2, then
the Augmenting Path Algorithm discussed earlier will run in O(VE) = O(N×N2) = O(N3).


This is only OK for V ∈ [400..500].


Try executing the standard Augmenting Path Algorithm on this Extreme Test Case, which is an almost complete K5,5 Bipartite Graph.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

The MCBM problem can be modeled as a Max Flow problem. Go to Max Flow visualization page and see the flow graph modeling of MCBM problem (select Modeling → Bipartite Matching → all 1).


If we use one of the fastest Max Flow algorithm, i.e. Dinic's algorithm on this flow graph, we can find Max Flow = MCBM in O(√(V)E) time — analysis omitted for now. This allows us to solve MCBM problem with V ∈ [1 000..1 500].

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

The key idea of Hopcroft Karp's (HK) Algorithm (invented in 1973) is identical to Dinic's Max Flow Algorithm discussed earlier, i.e. prioritize shortest augmenting paths (in terms of number of edges used) first. That's it, augmenting paths with 1 edge are processed first before longer augmenting paths with 3 edges, 5 edges, 7 edges, etc (the length always increase by 2 due to the nature of augmenting path in a Bipartite Graph).


Hopcroft Karp's Algorithm has time complexity of O(√(V)E) — analysis omitted for now. This allows us to solve MCBM problem with V ∈ [1 000..1 500].


Try HK Algorithm on the same Extreme Test Case earlier. You will notice that HK Algorithm can find the MCBM in a much faster time than the previous standard O(VE) Augmenting Path Algorithm.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

However, we can actually make the easy-to-code Augmenting Path Algorithm discussed earlier to avoid its worst case O(VE) behavior by doing O(V+E) randomized (to avoid adversary test case) greedy pre-processing before running the actual algorithm.


This O(V+E) additional pre-processing step is simple: For every vertex on the left set, match it with a randomly chosen unmatched neighbouring vertex on the right set. This way, we eliminates many trivial (one-edge) Augmenting Paths that consist of a free vertex u, an unmatched edge (u, v), and a free vertex v.


Try Augmenting Path Algorithm++ on the same Extreme Test Case earlier. Notice that the pre-processing step already eliminates many trivial 1-edge augmenting paths, making the actual Augmenting Path Algorithm only need to do little amount of additional work.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

Quite often, on randomly generated Bipartite Graph, the randomized greedy pre-processing step has cleared most of the matchings.


However, we can construct test case like: Examples: Randomized Greedy Processing Killer to make randomization as ineffective as possible. For every group of 4 vertices, there are 2 matchings. Random greedy processing has 50% chance of making mistake per group. Try this Hard Test Case case to see for yourself.


The worst case time complexity is no longer O(VE) but now O(kE) where k is a small integer, much smaller than V, k can be as small as 0 and is at most V/2. In our experiments, we estimate k to be "about √(V)" too. This version of Augmenting Path Algorithm++ allows us to solve MCBM problem with V ∈ [1 000..1 500] too.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

There are two Max Cardinality Matching (MCM) algorithms in this visualization:

  1. O(V^3) Edmonds's Matching algorithm (without greedy pre-processing),
  2. O(V^3) Edmonds's Matching algorithm (with greedy pre-processing),
Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

In General Graph, we may have Odd-Length cycle. Augmenting Path is not well defined in such graph, hence we cannot directly implement Claude Berge's lemma like what we did with Bipartite Graph.


Jack Edmonds call a path that starts from a free vertex u, alternates between free, matched, ..., free edges, and returns to the same free vertex u as Blossom. This situation is only possible if we have Odd-Length cycle, i.e. non-Bipartite Graph. Edmonds then proposed Blossom shrinking/contraction and expansion algorithm to solve this issue, details verbally.


This algorithm can be implemented in O(V^3).

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

As with the Augmenting Path Algorithm++ for the MCBM problem, we can also do randomized greedy pre-processing step to eliminate as many 'trivial matchings' as possible upfront. This reduces the amount of work of Edmonds's Matching Algorithm, thus resulting in a faster time complexity — analysis TBA.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

We have not added visualizations for weighted variant of MCBM and MCM problems (future work).

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

As the action is being carried out, each step will be described in the status panel.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

e-Lecture: The content of this slide is hidden and only available for legitimate CS lecturer worldwide. Drop an email to visualgo.info at gmail dot com if you want to activate this CS lecturer-only feature and you are really a CS lecturer (show your University staff profile).

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

Control the animation with the player controls! Keyboard shortcuts are:

Spacebar: play/pause/replay
Left/right arrows: step backward/step forward
-/+: decrease/increase speed
Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp
Próx. PgDn

Return to 'Exploration Mode' to start exploring!


Note that if you notice any bug in this visualization or if you want to request for a new visualization feature, do not hesitate to drop an email to the project leader: Dr Steven Halim via his email address: stevenhalim at gmail dot com.

Print this e-Lecture
X Esc
Ant. PgUp

Desenhar Grafo

Modeling

Examples

Augmenting Path

>

Rook Attack

GO

Generate Random Bipartite Graph

Undirected Max Flow Killer

House of Cards

CS4234 Tutorial 3

F-mod

Randomized Greedy Processing Killer

K5,5

K5,5 (Almost)

Standard

With Randomized Greedy Preprocessing

Hopcroft Karp

Edmonds Blossom

Edmonds Blossom + Greedy

Sobre Time Termos de uso

Sobre

O VisuAlgo foi conceitualizado em 2011 por Dr. Steven Halim como uma ferramenta para auxiliar seus estudantes a entenderem melhor estruturas de dados e algoritmos, permitindo que eles aprendessem o básico por conta e em seu próprio ritmo.
VisuAlgo contém muitos algoritmos avançados que são discutidos no livro de Dr. Steven Halim ('Competitive Programming', em co-autoria com seu irmão Dr. Felix Halim) e além. Hoje, algumas visualizações/animações destes algoritmos avançados só podem ser encontrados no VisuAlgo.
Apesar de ter sido especificamente projetado para os estudantes da Universidade Nacional de Singapura (NUS) cursando várias disciplinas de estruturas de dados e algoritmos (ex.: CS1010, CS1020, CS2010, CS2020, CS3230, e CS3230), como defensores do aprendizado online, nós esperamos que mentes curiosas ao redor do mundo achem estas visualizações úteis também.
VisuAlgo não foi projetado para funcionar bem em telas de toque pequenas (ex.: smartphones) desde o  princípio devido à necessidade de atender a muitas visualizações complexas de algoritmos que requerem vários pixels e gestos de clicar-e-arrastar para interação. A resolução mínima para uma experiência de usuário respeitável é 1024x768 e somente a página inicial é relativamente amigável a dispositivos móveis. 
VisuAlgo é um projeto em andamento e mais visualizações complexas ainda estão em desenvolvimento. 
O desenvolvimento mais excitante é o gerador de questões e verificador automático (o sistema de quiz online) que permite aos estudantes testar seus conhecimentos de estruturas de dados e algoritmos básicos. As questões são aleatoriamente geradas através de algumas regras e as respostas dos estudantes são instantaneamente e automaticamente avaliadas assim que são submetidas para o nosso servidor de avaliação. Este sistema de quiz online, quando for adotado por mais instrutores de Ciência da Computação ao redor do mundo, deve tecnicamente eliminar questões manuais sobre estruturas de dados e algoritmos básicos de provas típicas de Ciência da Computação em muitas Universidades. Definindo um peso pequeno (mas não-zero) para aqueles aprovados no quiz online, um instrutor de Ciência da Computação pode (significativamente) melhorar o domínio de seus estudantes sobre estas questões básicas, uma vez que os estudantes têm virtualmente um número infinito de questões para praticar que podem ser verificadas instantaneamente antes que eles possam fazer o quiz online. O modo de treino atualmente contém questões para 12 módulos de visualização. Em breve nós adicionaremos os 8 módulos de visualização restantes, para que todos os módulos de visualização no VisuAlgo tenham um componente de quiz online.
Outro ramo de desenvolvimento em atividade é o subprojeto de internacionalização do VisuAlgo. Nós queremos preparar uma base de dados de termos de Ciência da Computação para todos os textos em inglês que aparecem no sistema VisuAlgo. Esta é uma tarefa grande e requer crowdsourcing. Uma vez que o sistema estiver pronto, nós convidaremos os visitantes do VisuAlgo a contribuir, especialmente se você não for um falante nativo de inglês. Atualmente, nós também temos notas públicas sobre o VisuAlgo em vários idiomas:
zh, id, kr, vn, th.

Time

Líder do Projeto & Conselheiro (Julho de 2011-presente)
Dr Steven Halim, Senior Lecturer, School of Computing (SoC), National University of Singapore (NUS)
Dr Felix Halim, Software Engineer, Google (Mountain View)

Estudantes Pesquisadores de Graduação 1 (Jul 2011-Apr 2012)
Koh Zi Chun, Victor Loh Bo Huai

Projeto Final do Ano/Estudantes do Programa de Oportunidades de Pesquisa para a Graduação (UROP) 1 (Jul 2012-Dec 2013)
Phan Thi Quynh Trang, Peter Phandi, Albert Millardo Tjindradinata, Nguyen Hoang Duy

Projeto Final do Ano/Estudantes do Programa de Oportunidades de Pesquisa para a Graduação (UROP) 2 (Jun 2013-Apr 2014)
Rose Marie Tan Zhao Yun, Ivan Reinaldo

Estudantes Pesquisadores de Graduação 2 (May 2014-Jul 2014)
Jonathan Irvin Gunawan, Nathan Azaria, Ian Leow Tze Wei, Nguyen Viet Dung, Nguyen Khac Tung, Steven Kester Yuwono, Cao Shengze, Mohan Jishnu

Projeto Final do Ano/Estudantes do Programa de Oportunidades de Pesquisa para a Graduação (UROP) 3 (Jun 2014-Apr 2015)
Erin Teo Yi Ling, Wang Zi

Projeto Final do Ano/Estudantes do Programa de Oportunidades de Pesquisa para a Graduação (UROP) 4 (Jun 2016-Dec 2017)
Truong Ngoc Khanh, John Kevin Tjahjadi, Gabriella Michelle, Muhammad Rais Fathin Mudzakir

List of translators who have contributed ≥100 translations can be found at statistics page.

Agradecimentos
Este projeto foi tornado possível pela generosa Concessão de Aperfeiçoamento de Ensino do Centro de Desenvolvimento de Ensino e Aprendizado (CDTL) da Universidade Nacional de Singapura (NUS).

Termos de uso

VisuAlgo é gratuito para a comunidade de Ciência da Computação na Terra. Se você gosta do VisuAlgo, o único pagamento que lhe pedimos é que você fale da existência do VisuAlgo para outros estudantes/instrutores de Ciência da Computação que você conhece =) via Facebook, Twitter, página do curso, blog, email, etc.
Se você é um estudante/instrutor de estruturas de dados e algoritmos, você tem permissão para usar este site diretamente para suas aulas. Se você tirar capturas de tela (vídeos) deste site, você pode usar as capturas de tela (vídeos) em outros lugares desde que você cite a URL deste website (http://visualgo.net) e/ou a lista de publicações abaixo como referência. Contudo, você NÃO tem permissão para baixar os arquivos do VisuAlgo (do lado do cliente) e hospedá-los em seu website, uma vez que isso configura plágio. No momento, nós NÃO permitimos a outras pessoas copiar este projeto e criar variantes do VisuAlgo. Não há problemas em usar a cópia offline (lado do cliente) do VisuAlgo para seu uso pessoal.
Note que o componente do quiz online do VisuAlgo, por natureza, é um componente pesado para os servidores e não há maneira fácil de salvar os scripts e bases de dados do servidor localmente. Atualmente, o público em geral pode apenas usar o 'modo de treinamento' para acessar este sistema de quiz online. Atualmente, o 'modo de prova' é um ambiente mais controlado para usar estas questões geradas randomicamente e verificação automática para um exame real na Universidade Nacional de Singapura (NUS). Outros instrutores de Ciência da Computação interessados devem contatar o prof. Dr. Steven Halim se você quiser experimentar este 'modo de prova'.'

Lista de Publicações

Este trabalho foi apresentado brevemente no CLI Workshop durante a Final Mundial do ACM ICPC 2012 (Polônia, Varsóvia) e na IOI Conference durante a IOI 2012 (Sirmione-Montichiari, Itália). Você pode clicar neste link para ler nosso paper de 2012 sobre este sistema (ele ainda não era chamado VisuAlgo em 2012).
Este trabalho foi feito em sua maioria por meus estudantes anteriores. Os relatórios finais mais recentes estão aqui: Erin, Wang Zi, Rose, Ivan.

Avisos de Bugs ou Solicitações de Novas Funcionalidades

VisuAlgo não é um projeto finalizado. Dr. Steven Halim ainda está ativamente melhorando o VisuAlgo. Se você está usando o VisuAlgo e perceber um bug em qualquer uma de nossas páginas de visualizações/ferramenta de quiz online ou se você quiser solicitar novas funcionalidades, por favor contate o Dr. Steven Halim. O contato dele é a concatenação de seu nome e adicione gmail ponto com.